Alabaster

Set Descending Direction
View as Grid List

20 Items

per page
Set Descending Direction
View as Grid List

20 Items

per page

Story About

The use of alabaster in Egypt dates back to the Pharaonic era of Egyptian history. The ancient Egyptians used this beautiful material for a myriad of purposes. It was used in making basic household objects, sacrificial items and funerary purposes such as for canopic jars or sarcophagi. Some of the most ornate and luxurious alabaster artifacts were unearthed with the discovery of King Tutankhamun’s tomb. A wide range of items made of stunning Egyptian alabaster were buried with the infamous king. Of them were beautiful alabaster perfume jars! Ancient Alabaster from Egypt and the Near East is of the calcite variety. It was mined out of stalactites and stalagmites. It is also mined out of travertine deposits in limestone caverns, which are found abundantly near El-Suez in Egypt. Many ancient quarries have been found in this region. The name alabaster is believed to have derived from the Ancient Egyptian “a-labaste”, a term referring to the goddess Bastet. She is typically depicted as a lioness and her figure would often sit on the top of alabaster items. Alabaster was used for a variety of different items, from small vessels to carry perfumes, to burial items, to sculptures and tombs. It was a highly-versatile material due to its soft and easily malleable texture as well as its natural white color with natural colored veins. It was popular for making altarpieces and even small reliefs. In Ancient Egypt, the most common type of jar or vessel was made out of alabaster. Alabaster jars are among some of the most commonly found ancient Egyptian artifacts. Alabaster jars were used as containers for cosmetic products or just for decorative purposes. Many ancient peoples from Egypt to Mesopotamia used alabaster for home decor as it was not difficult to carve and was used as a less expensive alternative to marble. In the early dynastic period, the ancient Egyptians employed alabaster as a minor building material for lining walls. It was used primarily for tiny objects such as statues, shawabti figurines, vases of many shapes and forms, kitchenware and even altar tables. Usually alabaster was not used for making larger objects but there are a few instances of it being used in shrines, large statues and even embalming beds. However, by the Middle Kingdom, alabaster was quarried at Hatnub and was used as material for massive statues. Alabaster grew in popularity and use by the time of the New Kingdom. Alabaster was incorporated into almost every facet of life. Here at Swan Bazaar we have a range of alabaster antiques made in the style of the ancient Egyptians. Alabaster was popular in ancient Egypt for vases, urns and ornaments. We offer a wide array of pharaonic-style items ranging from statues to bowls and dishes and even decorative items such as statues or vases, just as the ancient Egyptian would have had. We have a beautiful assortment of Egyptian antiques for sale that capture the simplicity and beauty of ancient Egyptian craftsmanship and ingenuity. Alabaster was often used to make altarpieces. One of the most popular symbols to come out of ancient Egypt is the scarab beetle. We offer a variety of beautiful, hand-carved scarab beetles made of the finest ancient Egyptian alabaster stone. Scarab beetles were popular amulets and impressions seal in ancient Egypt. It is an ancient sacred symbol of immortality, resurrection, transformation and protection. The scarab beetle was one of the most significant religious symbols in ancient Egypt, associated with the mighty sun god, Ra. The Egyptians viewed the scarab as a symbol of renewal and rebirth. The beetle was associated closely with the sun god because it rolls large balls of dung to lay their eggs, a behavior that the Egyptians thought resembled the progression of the sun through the sky from east to west. Each scarab beetle we offer is unique in its own way. They are handmade by small Egyptian families in Luxor, where the use of alabaster is still popular until today. These delicately-carved scarab beetles come in a wide range of stunning colors and are ornamented with holy inscriptions or other sacred motifs and symbols such as the key of life. Alabaster was used to make a variety of small items like statues and figurines. Here at Swan Bazaar, we are following in that tradition and offer a large variety of different alabaster statues of the most important gods, kings and symbols from antiquity. We have statues celebrating Queen Nefertiti, the mighty god Horus, the revered god Anubis, Baster, Hathor, obelisks, the great sphinx and much more. We also offer a wide range of kitchenware and decorative vases all handmade from magnificent alabaster. Our vintage bowls and plates come in a variety of rich, vibrant colors with a pharaonic flare. Moreover, we have all types of rare, beautiful vases. Some are simply carved such as our wide neck Rustic Handmade Alabaster vase, with the beautiful veins of the alabaster as the main star. Other are more intricate such as our Royal Ancient Egyptian Style Alabaster Vase, which is decorated with delicately-painted scenes reminiscent of ancient Egyptian murals and is engraved on both sides with the ankh or key of life, which is representative of eternal life in Ancient Egypt. By purchasing these unique handmade vases, you are not only owning a piece of history but you are also supporting a small local art form in Egypt. The native artists who handmade all these beautiful alabaster items infuse the authenticity of their cultural heritage into their handmade artistic products, which ensures the originality and uniqueness of each item we offer. This alabaster items are an expression of their love to the richness and beauty of their country’s history. We have a wide variety of stunning alabaster items, all inspired by ancient Egyptian practices and techniques. Each item is unique and represent different periods of Egyptian innovation and creativity. Alabaster was one of the ancient Egyptians most widely used materials and is still a largely popular stone, used today in modern Egypt.